FAQs

What is Prospect Manager?

Prospect Manager (PM) is an online platform that educates, guides and empowers Student-Athletes to control and manage their own recruiting process. PM helps Prospects find colleges that are right for them. With over 1,800 post-secondary schools offering either baseball or softball intercollegiate programs in the United States, PM is a vital resource helping Prospects find the appropriate schools to further their game while continuing their education.

What does Prospect Manager offer a Prospect?

1) A Prospect Profile. Create your Profile through the registration process and update it as your information changes. Send your Profile to coaches and can easily update it as your information changes. All information is stored online in our database, so as soon as you change it, it is immediately updated and available for coaches to see.

2) A Powerful Search Engine. Identify schools that provide an intercollegiate baseball or softball program while meeting academic, financial, geographic, demographic and athletic requirements. Search for schools that offer your expected college major while being in your SAT/ACT range. Easily add filters for location, distance from home, size of the school, type of school, cost, league (NCAA, NAIA, JUCO, Other), conference, mascot, ...

3) Private List of Schools. Add colleges to your Private List. Rank them. PM automatically creates a Prospect Card with tasks to improve the odds of being recruiting by that college. It tracks your progress and updates your color-coded At-A-Glance Progress Chart - a concise overview of the progress for all your schools.

4) College Profiles. Over 1,800 schools in our database with neatly categorized information (General, Academic, Financial, Athletic). Every profile contains over 60 pieces of important information to help you determine if the school is a fit for you. It also includes: flying mileage, driving mileage, driving time from the Prospect's home to determine if it meets your distance requirements.

5) Direct Links. Save time with links to where you need to go. With the link to the college’s academic website, you can easily research more about the college and its culture. With the link to the baseball/softball website, you can access the coaches’ contact info, the current roster, schedule, results, … The map link provides a map of the school area. See what surrounds the school, find places to visit, dining options, get directions, ...

6) Interaction with College Coaches. A free database to college coaches who are constantly watching our database of athletes.

And there's more ... Dig in and check it out!

What are the differences among the NCAA, NAIA, NCCAA and the NJCAA (JUCO)?

The NCAA is the National Collegiate Athletic Association. It is the largest governing body of college athletics in the nation. It has 3 divisions: D1, D2 and D3. Divisions I and II both offer athletic scholarships. Division III student-athletes can only receive academic or non-athletic scholarships – no athletic scholarships are allowed.
  • D1 has about 301 schools with baseball programs and 293 softball programs.
  • D2 has about 265 schools with baseball programs and 288 softball programs.
  • D3 has about 385 schools with baseball programs and 397 softball programs.

The NAIA is the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics. It is a college athletics association for small colleges and universities in North America. It has 2 divisions: D1 and D2. Most NAIA schools (90+%) offer scholarships to student-athletes.

  • NAIA D1 has 80+ schools with baseball programs and 80+ schools with softball programs.
    NAIA D1 is equivalent to NCAA D2 with regard to baseball/softball programs.
  • NAIA D2 has 100+ schools with baseball programs and 100+ schools with softball programs.

The NCCAA is the National Christian College Athletic Association. The NCCAA consists of primarily bible colleges and small Christian colleges and is divided into two divisions.

The NJCAA, also commonly referred to as JUCO, is the National Junior College Athletic Association. It has about 385 schools with baseball programs and 329 schools with softball programs.

 

Can you explain the different divisions?

The NCAA has 3 divisions. Most student-athletes start out aiming for NCAA D1. However, you need to decide what type of college experience is the most beneficial for you.
  • D1 is the most competitive and the one that gathers the most attention.
  • D2 is less competitive and within reach of more players.
  • D3 offers no athletic scholarships, but has the most schools with programs. College coaches can offer financial packages that are made up of academic grants and need-based aid that can be extremely appealing for families and cover a hefty amount of tuition.
  • The NAIA is on par with NCAA D3 schools as far as the balance between sports and life is concerned. Top level NAIA teams are on par with NCAA D2 teams. The NAIA's aggressive recruiting is raising the level of competitiveness and it awards about $500M a year in athletic scholarships. When you consider cost, location, academics in addition to athletics, the NAIA is likely to put schools on your short list.
  • JUCO - Junior Colleges - offer more than most people realize. Less costly, the opportunity to complete core classes before transferring to a 4 year college, the chance to play and physically develop before moving on, ... Many NCAA D1 players refine their skills and mature at a JUCO first. Eligibility requirements are less to enter a JUCO and JUCO schools are able to offer part and full scholarships.
 

How many scholarships are given?

This will probably be a disheartening answer - and a wakeup call to reality - for many people. The number of scholarships varies by division and each college must choose to fund the number - and not all schools fund to the maximum amount allowed. Scholarships come in 2 types:
  • Head count - meaning that 1 person receives a full scholarship
  • Equivalency - meaning that "1 scholarship" can be split among 2 or more players.
A full scholarship includes tuition, fees, books, room, and board. It is rare that a full scholarship is given to a baseball player. In the NCAA, there is roster limit for D1. The roster limit for D1 is 35 players per team once the season begins and only 27 players can receive scholarships. Anyone who receives a scholarship must receive at least 25% of the total cost of attendance. The following limits apply to the entire team, so incoming student-athletes at a 4 year school are competing for approximately 25% of the maximum available scholarships (and places on the team).
  • NCAA D1: 11.7 is the maximum number of scholarships for baseball. 12 is the maxnumber for softball. Baseball is an equivalency sport, so these scholarships can be divided among a maximum of 27 players. 11.7 is the total for all players on the team. So if divided equally among the 27 players eligible to receive a scholarship, and each player were to receive an equal share, then each player would receive 43.33% of a scholarship.
  • NCAA D2: 9 is the maximum number of scholarships for baseball; 7.2 is the max number for softball. Baseball is an equivalency sport, so these scholarships can be divided among a maximum of 27 players. 9 is the total for all players on the team.
  • NCAA D3: 0 is the maximum number of scholarships. NCAA D3 schools, by definition, do not provide athletic scholarships. HOWEVER, they can provide merit or need-based financial aid.
  • NAIA: 12 is the maximum number of scholarships for baseball; 10 is the max number for softball. Baseball is an equivalency sport, so these scholarships can be divided among the players. 12 is the total for all players on the team. For NAIA schools, aid to JV student-athletes does not count towards the limit on athletic scholarships.
  • NCCAA: Division 1 colleges may offer up to 12 baseball scholarships. Division 2 colleges are not allowed to offer any athletic scholarships.
  • NCJAA: 24 is the maximum number of scholarships for baseball D1 and D2 schools. 24 is the max number for softball D1 and D2 schools. D3 schools cannot offer scholarships. 24 is the total for all players on the team. NJCAA sports are head-count sports with respect to scholarship limits.
  • CCCAA: No scholarships are allowed. The California Community Colleges are already heavily subsidized and do not offer athletic scholarships. They do offer academic aid.

Tell me about the NCAA Division 1 Recruiting Calendar. Are there certain times when coaches and prospective student-athletes can interact?

Yes, there are limits on when coaches can interact with and recruit prospective student-athletes. Recruiting calendars define what can occur and when it can occur. Please see the NCAA D1 Recruiting Calendar. For additional info, see NCAA Recruiting Calendars.

Tell me about the NCAA Division 2 Recruiting Calendar.

From 2019-20 NCAA Division II Manual and NCAA Division II Dead Periods in Sports other than Football and Basketball:
13.17.4 Dead Periods for Other Sports. There are no specified contact and evaluation periods in sports other than basketball and football except for the following dead periods. (Revised: 7/20/10)
     13.17.4.1 National Letter of Intent Signing Date. The period 48 hours before 7 a.m. on the date for signing the National Letter of Intent in the applicable sport. (Revised: 1/10/91, 8/2/91, 8/14/96 effective 8/1/97, 7/20/10)

Tell me about the NCAA Division 3 Recruiting Calendar.

Division 3 schools do not offer athletic scholarships - therefore, no recruiting calendar - but many D3 schools offer healthy academic scholarships to student athletes.

Can you tell me about NAIA recruiting rules?

The NAIA is less restrictive than the NCAA. It does not regulate the campus visits, tryouts, contact or communication between a coach and a prospective student-athlete.

What is a recruiting "contact"?

A contact occurs any time a college coach says more than hello during a face-to-face contact with a college-bound student-athlete or his or her parents off the college’s campus.

Can you give me some helpful tips on communicating with coaches via email?

Do not ignore email from a college coach, even if it is unsolicited. If you are not interested in that college, respond and politely tell the coach so. Someday, that coach may be at a different school, where you ARE interested in attending. Also, coaches talk with each other. Someone may ask if he knows anyone who ... So you want to make sure that you represent yourself well. Word gets around.

Double check your email response. Proper English, correct names, ... Read it aloud to see what it sounds like. You may find that you need to change what you wrote.

Many, perhaps most, schools do not have enough time, or a large enough budget, to attend numerous games outside of their home territory. Many coaches attend or put on camps/showcases in order to see lots of players at once. If you receive a personal email from a coach inviting you to a camp/showcase, consider it and respond accordingly to the coach.

Once you are logged in, you can access sample email templates in the "Work with My Profile" section at the top of your Prospect page.

What are a "contact period", a "quiet period" and a "dead period"?

What is a contact period? During a contact period, a college coach may have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents, watch student-athletes compete and visit their high schools, and write or telephone student-athletes or their parents.

What is a quiet period? During a quiet period, a college coach may only have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents on the college’s campus. A coach may not watch student-athletes compete (unless a competition occurs on the college’s campus) or visit their high schools. Coaches may write or telephone college-bound student-athletes or their parents during this time.

What is a dead period? During a dead period a college coach may not have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents, and may not watch student-athletes compete or visit their high schools. Coaches may write and telephone student-athletes or their parents during a dead period.

What is the difference between an official visit and an unofficial visit?

Any visit to a college campus by a college-bound student-athlete or his or her parents paid for by the college is an official visit. Visits paid for by college-bound student-athletes or their parents are unofficial visits. During an official visit the college can pay for transportation to and from the college for the prospect, lodging and three meals per day for both the prospect and the parent or guardian, as well as reasonable entertainment expenses including three tickets to a home sports event. The only expenses a college-bound student-athlete may receive from a college during an unofficial visit are three tickets to a home sports event.

What is an NCAA ID? What is an NAIA ID? How do I obtain them?

To compete at an NCAA Division I or II school, you need to be certified by the NCAA Eligibility Center. The NCAA ID is part of this process. (You need to create a Certification Account to make official visits to Divisions I and II schools or to sign a National Letter of Intent.)  To compete at an NAIA school, your eligibility needs to be certified by the NAIA Eligibility Center. The NAIA ID is part of this process.

Please show me a map of the baseball/softball regions.

Map of Baseball/Softball Regions